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  4. My 14 month son was eating very well, he never refused food, and would eat anything he was given. Moved into my mums house, and my younger siblings (7 & 9) are very picky eaters. Would seeing them refuse food make him refuse food?
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My 14 month son was eating very well, he never refused food, and would eat anything he was given. Moved into my mums house, and my younger siblings (7 & 9) are very picky eaters. Would seeing them refuse food make him refuse food?

He's refusing most foods. He will shake his head and push food away, even throw it on the floor if he doesn't want it, which is most meals. He would normally be very happy with a Marmite sandwich, but now he just throws it or pushes it away. He was eating very well, and would eat anything we gave him. About a month ago we moved in with my Mum, and he's started to stop eating. He refuses everything, and my three younger siblings (7 Year old twins, and a 9 year old), have done the same for as long as I can remember. The only way I can get him to eat is to put a bit of food on my finger, and put it in his mouth so he knows what it tastes like. We have been trying to feed my son and my siblings at separate times so he doesn't see them eat, but often that's not possible. Is it possible that seeing them refuse food will cause him to refuse food? He's never done this before, and has always wanted to eat the same things we eat.

Jane ...
Answer: Hi, Perhaps the role modelling isn't helping but to be honest, most toddlers slow down with their eating after the first birthday when their growth slows down and they don't need the same volume of food for their growth. Try not to fuss too much or give him lots of attention, your job is to prepare and offer him his food and how much he eats and if he eats is really up to him. If he learns that by not eating he gets more attention from you rather than less, then he'll quickly learn that it's worthwhile to be fussy. Investing enormous amounts of time and energy into our children's fussiness with eating can take years of pleasure away from the joy of shared eating. Think about how much milk he's having through the day, too much milk will fill his tummy and this won't help. Be very matter of fact about it all and just focus on your own positive role modelling, giving him 20 minutes or so to eat his meal, encouraging him to feed himself and being consistent. And check in with your CHN to make sure your toddler is growing and developing as he needs to. Best Jane
Answered: 25 Oct 2014